Cannabis use can affect the ability of young people to perform some tasks related to driving, a study in Canada found. Researchers at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, discovered that drivers 18-24 years old performed complex driving tasks less successfully up to five hours after consuming cannabis. The study was funded by the Canadian Automobile Association and published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

For the study, researchers used a simulator to study the driving abilities of 45 recreational cannabis users aged 18-24. Participants were tested before using cannabis and again one, three, and five hours after vaporizing a 100-milligram dose of cannabis with a THC content of 12.9 percent.

“Performance was almost always significantly better without cannabis,” the authors of the study wrote.

Researchers found that cannabis did not appear to affect simple driving tasks such as steering, braking, and maintaining a steady rate of speed. But when participants were asked to perform more complex driving tasks such as noticing multiple traffic hazards, they did not do as well after using cannabis.

“Among young recreational cannabis users, a 100-mg dose of cannabis by inhalation had no effect on simple driving-related tasks, but there was significant impairment on complex tasks, especially when

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