The president said that he could support the deal, but argued an executive order he issued last week designed to change insurance markets represented a better path forward on health care.

Democrats were more positive, though Murray told reporters that there were a few “irons” to work out, suggesting the deal may not be completely final.

Even with Trump’s support, it’s not entirely clear that a deal negotiated by Alexander and Murray can get through Congress. 

When Republicans in the Senate made a last-ditch effort to repeal ObamaCare in September, the Alexander-Murray talks were cut off, with some GOP senators saying their bipartisan efforts would go nowhere in the House.

The deal would restore $106 million in ObamaCare outreach funding that was cut by President Trump, according to a Democratic aide.

In a concession to Republicans, the deal would also amend a “guardrail” in ObamaCare to give states more flexibility to change rules through a waiver. States would now be allowed to make changes as long as they allowed “comparable” affordability to consumers, according to Alexander.

He said minimum standards for what insurance must cover have not been changed, which represents a priority for Democrats negotiating the compromise.

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